UK: Call for Ban on Glass Skyscrapers

The planet faces an environmental disaster due to excess greenhouse gas emissions, and buildings are major producers. Leading architects and engineers are calling for all-glass skyscrapers to be banned because they are too difficult and expensive to cool. And Sadiq Khan, the mayor of London, has ruled out such a plan for the British capital.

Glass-fronted workplaces, from prominent structures like the Shard to strip malls and mechanical parks, have turned out to be well known with planners and their customers since they make a capturing view in a city horizon, let in loads of common light and give incredible perspectives to those inside. Be that as it may, the daylight likewise brings heat, and in fixed structures there is no place for it to escape to normally something which, as Britain sweltered in a record-breaking heat wave a week ago, will have turned out to be clear to many working inside them.

To avoid this greenhouse effect, air conditioning has been the standard solution. But that is problematic in itself. The International Energy Agency estimates that about 40% of global carbon dioxide emissions come from constructing, heating, cooling and demolishing buildings. Air conditioning is a growing proportion of this: energy used on cooling has doubled since 2000 and accounts for about 14% of all energy use now.

Martin Fahey, head of sustainability at Mitsubishi Electric, said that “Most air conditioning equipment is designed to give an internal temperature between seven to 10 degrees lower than the ambient temperature”. The new form of the London Plan, the principles for all improvement in Greater London, which is because of produce results the following spring, will require development firms to make an evaluation of a structure’s vitality use over as long as its can remember cycle. The new form of the London Plan, the principles for all improvement in Greater London, which is because of produce results the following spring, will require development firms to make an evaluation of building’s energy use across its whole life-cycle.

> Alma Siddiqua



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